Thunderbird image
spacing image
Search   CARD   MediaBase
Colours  
Myths
Stories
Drumming
Music
Sound
Video
Interviews
Artists
Press
Scholars Site
Teachers Site
Kids Site
Website français venant bientôt.
Native Drums Homepage
Tell us what you think... Take a site survey
Scholars Site
Teachers Site
Kids Site
Set Large Text
Set Medium Text
Set Small Text
  Visit our
companion
   website

Visit our companion website, Native Dance
Native Dance

 

Site Design
Design and
technology by
Sumner Group


Site Content
Content by
Carleton
University


Acknowledgement
This site was
made possible by
the support of

Heritage Canada Logo
Drum Gallery
Mask Gallery
Chapter Buttons
Paul Kane Watercolour - Ojibwe Cermonial Drum
Painted Cree Frame Drum
Cedar Box Drum
Frame Drum with 2 Snares
Octagonal Painted Frame Drum
Butterfly Painted Frame Drum
Ojibwe Frame Drum
Cedar Log Drum
Raven Wolf Drum
Halibut Drum
Sculpin Drum
Iroquois Water Drum
Ojibwe Bird Drum
Dzunukwa Mask
Kwigwis Mask
Bakwas Mask
Deaf Man Mask
Nulamal Mask
Crooked Beak Mask
Baxbakwalanuksiwe Mask
Owl Mask
Ancestor Mask
Xwi Xwi Mask
Home
Drums
Masks
Myths
Stories
Drumming
Music
Introduction
Structuring
Uniqueness
Singing
Context
Drum Dance
Social Dance
Powwow
Glossary
Bibliography
Links

Sound
Video
Interviews
Showcase
Press
Citations
Teachers
Scholars
Card
About

 

Video bullet
Morningstar
River Singers
Perform Live


Video bullet
Making an
Ojibwe
Hand Drum


Interview bullet
How to
find your
Voice


Interview bullet
The When
and Why
of Drums


 

Glossary

Aboriginal: A person of descent from the First Peoples of this land now called Canada.

Bentside Boxes: A form of solid wood box common to many BC cultures. Constructed from a single plank of wood (cedar) which is grooved, steamed and then bent to make the box.

Dance Arbour: the central area at the pow wow site containing the singers and drummers area with the space for all the dancers. This is the area where most of the activity of the pow-wow takes place.

Frame Drum: Any drum with a hide stretched over a wood frame.

Honour Ceremony: A ceremony where a person or group is recognized for their contribution to a community or organization. Often this is done through “honour songs” and the giving of special gifts.

Intertribal Dance: A specific kind of dance held at the Powwow where everyone may dance. An opportunity for all races and cultures to join together in friendship and harmony.

Jingle Dress: A special dress used in the Jingle dress dance by women. Considered a healing dance, women dance to heal the people. The dress worn by these dancers is covered with rows of tin cones that jingle when the woman dances.

Kettle: As used in its archaic form meaning a large open topped pot or cauldron.

Lap or Lap Joint: the overlapping joint where the wood on the drum frame is overlapped and        thinned to make a solid , even join.

Medicine stone: A small stone that has symbolic meaning to a person and often serves as a reminder of a specific time, place or special event of spiritual importance in that persons life.

Metis: People descending from interracial marriage between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal.

Objet d’Art: Art Object - something to be bought and sold for purely decorative or investment purposes.

Snares: A long piece of rawhide or sinew that is strung across the drumhead that buzzes when the drum is struck. Sometimes the snare is also strung with small wooden sticks or bones.

Sweat - Sweatlodge: A purification ceremony involving the use of heat, steam and prayer. This  ceremony was originally just for the men but is now becoming a universal method for spiritual cleansing and preparation for important spiritual or personal work for both men and women.

Water Drum: A small to medium sized drum which uses a small, hollowed out log for the body and the head is secured with a hoop. Water in the body keeps the head moist and provides the resonance.

   * * *

 

Valid XHTML!     Level Triple-A conformance icon, W3C-WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0

 

Back to Top


This project was made possible with the support of the Department of Canadian Heritage through Canadian Culture Online

Heritage Canada Logo